Super Bowl 2014 Commercials That Marks Changes

Thursday, December 5, 2013

After this year’s Super Bowl, many companies have started to make plans on how they can be one of the Super Bowl 2014 commercials. Although many entries have been submitted already, some of them made it on the roster while there are also those who have been rejected. Of course, there are also old timers who want to change their tactics in order to make their ads more appealing to the consumers.

Here are some of the ads that got some spots in the events with some changes in their approach.

GoDaddy.com
If you’ve been watching the Super bowl for more than 10 years, and you see a GoDaddy commercial running, your mind may have to associate it with nothing more but ladies in their sexiest outfits. This year, the well-known website hosting company will have its tenth year of purchasing advertising space for this year’s sports event. Super Bowl 2014 will also be first for GoDaddy to release an ad that is going to be new in the minds of the viewers. In other words, the former skimpily dressed lady method will be set aside.

Last year’s GoDaddy Super Bowl ads surely had many people talking. Israeli super model, Bar Rafaeili, was featured kissing a heavyset, bespectacled nerd passionately. Since the commercial was unpleasant to watch and definitely low-brow in conception, it got plenty of attention, and thus it was effective.

Many of their previous ads have been represented by race car driver and attractive, statuesque brunette, Danica Patrick. This year, Danica will be appearing in two GoDaddy Super Bowl 2014 commercials. Only this time, the iconic “GoDaddy girl” will be fully clothed and the spots are going to be free of sexual malice.

The web hosting company has new senior executives, and they are putting marketing strategy in a new direction, towards humor. GoDaddy already has been known by many now, so using scandalous advertising is no longer need now compared to the years past.

Now, what will be the expected reaction from the viewers? Suppose that many of the male viewers would feel a bit let down if they don’t see much of the exposure. Nevertheless, the ads are more wholesome, child-friendly, and still get the attention of the consumers.

Nestle Butterfinger
It looks like Reese's is going to going to have a new sticky competition from Bart Simpson-backed Butterfinger. Nestle has bought itself a Super Bowl spot plugging for its latest peanut butter cup version of the beloved classic candy bar that will launch in January.

The sad thing for the Simpsons fans, however, is that Bart will not be appearing in the Super Bowl spot, according to the Butterfinger Brand Manager, Jeremy Vandervoet. He added that they wanted the brand to do something much broader than just sticking with the Simpsons since they are getting a little old. The 30-second ad is still under development, but it will keep the brand's "clever, irreverent personality." The said commercial will be plugged during the second half.

The line extension indicates a new level in the candy-bar wars on two fronts. First, Butterfinger is  aiming directly at Hershey Co.'s Reese's Peanut Butter Cups, the no. 1 chocolate confectionery brand in the U.S. with an estimated 11.5% share and more than $2 billion in sales for 2013, according to Euromonitor International. Second, Butterfinger will go head-to-head with Mars, which has been the sole candy marketer advertising in the game in the previous years. This year, Mars' still has a spot during the event, but it’s not yet determined whether it’s going to be M&Ms or Snickers.

Nestle USA has never bought a commercial spot at the Super Bowl before, and has spent minimally on the Butterfinger brand in recent years. This got about $9 million in measured-media support last year, compared with $82.2 million for Reese's, according to Kantar Media. The good news is that the spending gap could soon begin to close. Nestle says that the new Butterfinger Peanut Butter Cups will be the biggest product launch in the history of the candy bar. Butterfinger was originally created in 1923 and bought by Nestle in 1990. The campaign will more than double last year's spending and also include ads in the Major League Baseball's All Star Game and the Daytona 500, Mr. Vandervoet said. Butterfinger will be working with Interpublic Group of Cos.' Dailey of West Hollywood, Calif.

Butterfinger decided to reunite with Bart Simpson earlier this year. Bart has been the cartoon-face of the brand from 1988 to 2001. However, the partnership is set to end of this year.

Butterfinger is setting the line extension as taking the "classic peanut butter and chocolate combination to a whole new level." The cups will be filled with smooth peanut butter and include tiny bits of Butterfinger's original formula of molasses mixed with peanut butter and a mysterious flakey orange curst. The cups will also have a square shape, unlike Reese's circular mold.

Butterfinger has lots of catching up to do. The brand has only 1.9% share of the chocolate confectionery category, making it stuck in the 13th place, while M&Ms is No. 2. Snickers, ranked No. 3, came out with its own peanut-butter play in 2011 called Snickers Peanut Butter Squared, two square-shape bars that add peanut butter to the familiar mix of peanuts, caramel, nougat and milk chocolate.

Does Butterfinger peanut butter cups stand a chance in the competition? "Consumers will try it," said Matt Hudak, who covers candy for Euromonitor. However, in order for buyers to switch permanently, Butterfinger "has to taste pretty much amazing because Reese's Peanut Butter cup is the peanut butter cup," he said. Hershey, he added, "doesn't lose focus" on Reese's "so jumping into that is always going to be a bit of a battle."

Hershey said it has no plans to get into the Super Bowl, according to a spokeswoman. Mars has also declined to comment on the matter. Nevertheless, it is going to be quite a sticky competition for all three candy companies.

0 comments:

Post a Comment

More Hot Stories

Social with us:




Search

Loading

Hot Super Bowl News

More Hot Stories